CATHERINE MCKINLEY – MOTHER MARY EDWARD

 

1837 – 1904

Catherine McKinley was born in Kingston, Ontario on August 14, 1837. Her father was John McKinley, a ship-owner, and her mother was Sarah McCaffrey. Catherine trained as a dressmaker prior to seeking admission to the newly founded religious congregation in Kingston. View full article »

It is a task of some little difficulty, and of no little delicacy, to treat properly of one who has lived and died in our own time, and it is quite possible that the author of this sketch has said either too much or too little, and in consequence has fallen into some inaccuracies. But if this attempt should have the effect of stimulating some one better qualified to devote herself more successfully to the work, her humble efforts will not have been wholly in vain. View full article »

First General Superior
Sisters of Providence of St. Vincent de Paul

1837

Catherine McKinley is born in Kingston, Ontario on August 14. She is baptized on September 5.

 
1861

The Sisters of Charity from Montreal arrive December 13 to begin a new religious Congregation in Kingston.

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A complete list of all of Catherine McKinley Letters on record.
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Mother Mary Edward
Kingston native Catherine McKinley (Mother Mary Edward).

The courage and pioneer spirit of Catherine McKinley are cherished as a lasting legacy by the only religious congregation founded in Kingston, Ontario, Canada. View full article »

The Spirit Of Mother Edward

By: Sr. M. Electa
September 18, 1976

A biography of St. Louise de Marillac has this comment: To have read and to have diligently studied Louise’s letters is to know her as she really was. Her inmost character reveals itself in them. We see her single-mindedness, her patience with human frailty, her gentleness in correction, her love of God and man. It may have been with this thought in mind that the Sisters who organized Heritage Day asked me to select from the files of Mother Edward’s correspondence some letters that might tell us more of her qualities of mind and heart than is apparent in the story of her active life. View full article »